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Showing 17–23 of 23 results

  • Indiana Genealogy Guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Indiana Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Indiana is located in the Midwest and Great Lakes region of the United States. It was initially part of the Northwest Territory which was ceded to the United States at the end of the Revolutionary War by the British. While many Native Americans had lived in Indiana for thousands of years it was quickly settled by people from New York, New England, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee. Many families migrated through Indiana, some stopping to work the farms and others in steel mills. Today the state is still a major transportation hub. The state’s motto is “Crossroads of America” and was the 19th state admitted to the union on December 11, 1816.

    The In-Brief Guide to Indiana Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Iowa genealogy guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Iowa Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Iowa is located in the Midwestern region of the United States. Iowa derives its name from the Indian word meaning “beautiful land.” Originally part of the Louisiana Territory it was part of both French and Spanish Louisiana. A stopping point for some migrating groups, the state hosts the largest Danish and Amish populations in the country. People also migrated into the state from the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, which border the east and west sides of the state. The state is known as “The Hawkeye State” and was admitted to the union as the 29th state on December 28, 1846.

    The In-Brief Guide to Iowa Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Arkansas Genealogy Guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Arkansas Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Arkansas is located in the Southern region of the United States and is host to a beautiful variety of natural ranges. The state is rich with natural resources such as farmland, lakes, rivers, and streams, gemstones and quarries. The resources and farmland attracted many migrant farmers from Kentucky during the 1800s. Arkansas is one state which had many soldiers who fought for both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War. The state is known as “The Natural State” and was the 25th state admitted to the union on June 15, 1836.

    The In-Brief Guide to Arkansas Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • An In-Brief Guide to Researching with the Dawes Rolls

    $2.75

    The Dawes enrollment was about land.  It was created to divide the Indian Territory tribal lands into individually owned allotments and pave the way for Oklahoma Statehood.  The land had been given to the tribes in a series of treaties that promised, as author and historian Angie Debo quoted, would be theirs “as long as the waters run, as long as the grass grows”. But that promise like many others was eventually broken.

    The Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory was created for the purpose of allotting the land.  It is commonly called the Dawes rolls because Senator, Henry Laurens Dawes of Massachusetts headed up the Commission that produced the rolls.

    The Dawes roll is a census of the Five “Civilized” Tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole) and it was taken in Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma) between 1898-1906.  The term “Civilized” is an archaic one which was used to differentiate them from the tribes who lived in more traditional ways.  The Five Tribes, lived as many people of European descent did.  They were farmers and businessmen, lived in permanent homes, built schools, and many of them owned slaves.

    The In-Brief Guide to Researching with the Dawes Rolls contains History, Indian Removal, Organization of the Dawes Commission, Requirements for the Dawes Rolls, Using the Dawes Rolls, and recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

     

     

  • An In-Brief Guide to Researching Your Civil War Ancestors

    $2.75

    With the observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, we have seen commemorations of various battles on the nightly news or even attended events locally. Remembering the bloody battle at Antietam or the widely known battle at Gettysburg piques our interest in life during that time. The continuing programs and events which pay tribute to those men who served may have prompted you to wonder whether your ancestor had a part in one of the most significant events in our country’s history. If your ancestors lived in this country during the mid-19th century, the answer to this is more than likely a resounding – Yes!

    Nearly 3 million men from both the north and south fought in the war. It’s been widely accepted that between 600,000 to 660,000 men from both sides died between 1861 and 1865, but new research puts the number higher – maybe as high as 750,000 men who perished during those four years. All these men left their homes, families and all that they knew to fight for their beliefs. With such a large percentage of the population participating in the Civil War, it’s more than likely one, if not several, of your ancestors fought.

    The In-Brief Guide to Researching your Civil War Ancestors contains Where to Start, History of Regiments, Civil War Pensions, Compiled Military Service Records, Courthouse Records, Civil War Draft Registrations, Special Enumerations, Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

     

     

  • An In-Brief Guide to Researching Your Jewish Ancestors

    $2.75

    When faced with the research of a Jewish ancestor, it may seem a daunting task. We think of the Holocaust and the incredible destruction of lives, synagogues, and cemeteries in Europe and wonder, why should I even try? Then there is the myth that immigrants had their names changed at Ellis Island and so our Jewish ancestors are nearly impossible to research. All of these things scare off many Jews from researching their family and discovering there actually is a great deal of information “out there.” Since 1654, millions of Jews fled Europe for the United States. Though the Jewish people have been moving steadily around the world since 586 BC, there are a number of great resources which can assist in genealogical research.

    The In-Brief Guide to Researching Your Jewish Ancestors contains Timeline of Jewish History, What does it mean to be Jewish, Migration Patterns, Key Records, Research Strategies, and many recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

     

  • An In-Brief Guide to Researching the Forbidden

    $2.75

    Every family has a story, some are shared and others are swept under the rug. Concern for the feelings of living family members, as well as the fear of what the public might think, are just a few of the reasons for keeping stories hidden. Some people know the sins of the past, while others stumble upon them while researching. The question then becomes: Do we share these secrets? If we decide to share what we have uncovered, then how will it affect the ones we love? As genealogists, every story should be recorded regardless of whether or not you decide to share the story with family and/or friends. These stories are a part of our family’s lives and could unlock the clues as to why we are the way we are today.

    The In-Brief Guide to Researching the Forbidden contains research strategies, record types, terminology, recommended resources and more. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.