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Showing 17–32 of 65 results

  • An In-Brief Beginner’s Guide to Genetics

    $2.75

    Genetic Genealogy is a hot topic in our field. It can tell you an amazing amount of information, but it can also lead you to even more questions. While you do not need to have a degree in genetics to understand your results, or to even use them in your research successfully, I have found those who have a basic understanding tend to do a bit better. This guide is an introduction to genetics for the genealogist and should help answer questions you may not have realized you were thinking about regarding the science behind the tests.

    The In-Brief Beginner’s Guide to Genetics written by Shannon Combs Bennett contains: Glossary, Explanations of DNA, Genes, and Chromosomes, Inheritance, Tests, Ethics, and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • An In-Brief Guide to Researching Your Scottish Ancestors

    $2.75

    Scotland has some of the best records for genealogy research in the world. And, fortunately, they have also done a fantastic job of both preserving these documents and making them available for research. Scotland was the first to digitize and make their collections available online. These documents are the records of the General Registrar’s Office and are available on the ScotlandsPeople website. The In-Brief Guide to Researching Your Scottish Ancestors by Christine Woodcock includes: Important Dates to Remember, Types of Documents Available Online, Useful Information within the Documents, Tips for Success, Archives, Libraries, Family History Societies, and much more. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • An In-Brief Guide to New York Genealogy

    $2.75

    An extremely important item to remember about research in New York State is that there is New York City, and the rest of the state. Many vital and other records concerning the five counties which comprise today’s New York City itself are not kept in other parts of the state. European settlements in the eastern and southeastern part of the state date from the early 1600’s, while parts of the western area were not fully established until the 1860’s. New York has mandated historians at the village, town, city, county and state level since the early 1920s.

    The In-Brief Guide to New York Genealogy written by Larry Naukam, contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • An In-Brief Guide to Pennsylvania Genealogy

    $2.75

    Pennsylvania’s nickname, the Keystone State, is true in genealogy as well. Many of our early ancestors first came to America through the port of Philadelphia which was also the nation’s first capital before it moved to Washington, D.C. “Penn’s woods” welcomed people of all faiths and ethnicities making it Penn’s “Holy Experiment.” The westward expansion of the early 1800s toward Pittsburgh and the head of the Ohio River saw our ancestors open new territories. The industrial revolution of the late 1800s and early 1900s brought new immigrant workers to the coal mines and steel mills of Pennsylvania. The Allegheny Mountains, which run through the center of the state, were a barrier to westward expansion and still divide the state today with differences from language accents and food to sports and politics.

    The In-Brief Guide to Pennsylvania Genealogy written by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • An In-Brief Guide to Virginia Genealogy

    $2.75

     

    Home to the oldest permanent English Settlement, Virginia has a long and storied history. Founded in 1607, it was on the forefront of much of the United States history. As such, there is a large variety of historical sites, battlefields, museums, and archives visitors to the state can enjoy. Virginia was also home to 8 presidents, giving it the nickname “Mother of Presidents” and a tradition of being politically active. With a temperate climate due to the Blue Ridge Mountains in the west and the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean in the east, the state has a little bit of everything from hiking to surfing for those who are adventurous.

    The In-Brief Guide to Virginia Genealogy written by Shannon Combs-Bennett contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Going In-Depth: March 2016 (PDF)

    $3.50

    Want to read Going In-Depth magazine, but don’t want to commit to a subscription?  Purchase the PDF for your own use!

    Here’s what is in this issue of the magazine:

    Blooms and Branches: “Extra! Extra! Exploring Historic Newspapers with Children” By Katie Andrews Potter

    Stories from the Battlefield: “Writing about the Women of World War II” By Jennifer Holik

    Genealogy Downunder: “Land Selections: An Enticement Downunder” By Shauna Hicks

    Getting Started: “The 1880 Census”  By Jenny Lanctot

    Genealogy Solutions: “Embrace Your Intuition” By Leslie Drewitz

    Indian Territory Genealogy: “Using the Eastern Cherokee Guion Miller Roll” By Liz Walker

    In the Land of the Maple Leaf: “Grosse Île Quarantine Station and Black ‘47” By Kathryn Lake Hogan, UE, PLCGS

    Nurturing Your African American Tree: “How My Grandfather’s Wallet Held the Key to Reuniting My Family”  By Marietta Britt

  • Bundle of State In-Brief Research Guides (PDF)

    $17.50

    A great deal for you!  Get all seven of our PDF state In-Brief Research Guides in one bundle.  Includes: Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, and Virginia!ri!

  • Missouri Research Guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Missouri Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Missouri is located in the Midwestern region of the United States. Originally the land belonged to the French and when sold to the United States, became part of the Missouri Territory through the Louisiana Purchase. The state got its name, meaning “town of the large canoes,” from the Missouri Indian tribe. Missouri is the Show-Me State and the Gateway to the West, through the Arch in St. Louis. Missouri was a stopping point for many migrants moving from the east coast in search of farmland as they moved westward across the country. The state was admitted to the union as the 24th state on August 10, 1821.

    The In-Brief Guide to Missouri Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Michigan Genealogy guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Michigan Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Michigan is located in the Midwest and Great Lakes region of the United States. It is a unique state geographically as it is the only one to consist of two peninsulas and touches four of the five Great Lakes. Many Native Americans had lived in Michigan for thousands of years before the French, English and Spanish colonized the land. Michigan derived its name, which means large lake, from the Indian words “Michi-gama”. The state boasts a huge automobile manufacturing industry which employed many people who lived within the state and neighboring states. Many people who wanted manufacturing jobs migrated to Michigan. The state is known as “The Wolverine State” and was the 26th state admitted to the union on January 26, 1837.

    The In-Brief Guide to Michigan Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Indiana Genealogy Guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Indiana Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Indiana is located in the Midwest and Great Lakes region of the United States. It was initially part of the Northwest Territory which was ceded to the United States at the end of the Revolutionary War by the British. While many Native Americans had lived in Indiana for thousands of years it was quickly settled by people from New York, New England, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee. Many families migrated through Indiana, some stopping to work the farms and others in steel mills. Today the state is still a major transportation hub. The state’s motto is “Crossroads of America” and was the 19th state admitted to the union on December 11, 1816.

    The In-Brief Guide to Indiana Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Iowa genealogy guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Iowa Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Iowa is located in the Midwestern region of the United States. Iowa derives its name from the Indian word meaning “beautiful land.” Originally part of the Louisiana Territory it was part of both French and Spanish Louisiana. A stopping point for some migrating groups, the state hosts the largest Danish and Amish populations in the country. People also migrated into the state from the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, which border the east and west sides of the state. The state is known as “The Hawkeye State” and was admitted to the union as the 29th state on December 28, 1846.

    The In-Brief Guide to Iowa Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Arkansas Genealogy Guide

    An In-Brief Guide to Arkansas Genealogy

    $2.75

    The state of Arkansas is located in the Southern region of the United States and is host to a beautiful variety of natural ranges. The state is rich with natural resources such as farmland, lakes, rivers, and streams, gemstones and quarries. The resources and farmland attracted many migrant farmers from Kentucky during the 1800s. Arkansas is one state which had many soldiers who fought for both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War. The state is known as “The Natural State” and was the 25th state admitted to the union on June 15, 1836.

    The In-Brief Guide to Arkansas Genealogy contains Factoids, Timeline, Research Strategies, Migration Routes and Motivations and many other recommended resources. This 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device.

  • Going In-Depth Magazine: February 2016

    Going In-Depth: February 2016 (PDF)

    $3.50

    Want to read the magazine, but don’t want to commit to a subscription?  Purchase the PDF for your own use!

    Here’s what is in this issue of the magazine:

    Specialized Studies & Projects: “Let’s Start at the Very Beginning: Part 2” By Tessa Keough

    In Search of Your Scottish Roots: “The Times in Which They Lived” By Christine Woodcock

    Across the Pond: “Restoration to Modern Day: 1690-1720” By Julie Goucher

    Family Reunions: “I’ve Got It on the List!” By Jenny Cowen

    Stories from the Battlefield: “5 Tips to Help You Plan to Walk in Your Soldier’s Footsteps” By Jennifer Holik

    Blooms and Branches: “Storytime with Our Ancestors” By Katie Andrews Potter

    German Rootseekers: “Know Your German History” By Ursula Krause

    Going Dutch: “Come and Go: Population Registers in the Netherlands” By John Boeren

    Genealogy Solutions: “If You Build It ~ They (May) Come: Getting Your Relatives Interested in the Family Tree” By Leslie Drewitz

    Remember the Ladies: “Getting Started Researching Female Ancestors” By Gena Philibert-Ortega

    Genealogy Downunder: “Mapped & Planned- Are You Missing Out?” By Shauna Hicks

  • Going In-Depth: January 2016 (PDF)

    $2.50

    Want to read the magazine, but don’t want to commit to a subscription?  Purchase the PDF for your own use!

    Here’s what is in this issue of the magazine:

    • Getting Started: “The 1890 Census” by Jenny Lanctot
    • Genealogy Downunder: “Why Did They Die? Investigating Deaths” by Shauna Hicks
    • Across the Pond: “Restoration to Modern Day: 1660 – 1690” by Julie Goucher
    • Doing It Ourselves: “Recollections: Kansas” by Larry Naukam
    • Beyond the Obituaries: “Wrapping up Local sources for an Ancestor Death Records” by Debbie Carder Mayes
    • Stories from the Battlefield: “Don’t Let the Story ONLY Be a Story” by Jennifer Holik
    • Blossoms & Branches: “Discovering the History Behind Your Family History” by Katie Andrews Potter
    • Family Reunions: “Team Reunion” by Jenny Cowen
    • Genealogy Solutions: “A Case Study: The Schwachtje Family, the Banat Ship List and the Donau Swabians” by Leslie Drewitz
    • Index of Surnames/ Places/ Subjects
  • Going In-Depth: December 2015 (PDF)

    $2.50

    Want to read the magazine, but don’t want to commit to a subscription?  Purchase the PDF for your own use!

    Here’s what is in this issue of the magazine:

    • Nurturing Your African American Tree: “Planting the Seeds of your African American Family Tree” by Marietta Britt
    • In the Land of the Maple Leaf: “Beginning Your Canadian Research” by Kathryn Lake Hogan, UE, PLCGS
    • Genealogy Solutions: “How to Entice Beginners With ‘Genealogy Fun’“ by Leslie Drewitz
    • German Rootseekers: “Herzlich Willkommen! A Beginner’s Guide to German Research” by Ursula Krause
    • Going Dutch: “An ABC of Dutch Genealogy Terms” by John Boeren
    • Blossoms & Branches: “Once upon a Time… Writing Family History with Children” by Katie Andrews Potter
    • Timeless Territories: “Getting Started with Land Records” by Michelle Goodrum
    • Specialized Studies & Projects: “Let’s Start at the Very Beginning” by Tessa Keough
    • In Search of Your Scottish Roots: “How to Start Researching Your Scottish Ancestors” by Christine Woodcock
    • Getting Started: “A Beginner’s Guide to Records Preservation and Access” by Jenny Lanctot
    • Stories from the Battlefield: “World War II Research- from the Beginning” by Jennifer Holik
    • Across the Pond: “Kick Starting Your Research across the Pond – England and Wales” by Julie Goucher
    • Doing It Ourselves: “Beginner’s Guide to Doing It Ourselves” by Larry Naukam
    • Jewish Genealogy: “Getting Started with Jewish Genealogy Research” by Jennifer Alford
    • Index of Surnames/ Places/ Subjects
  • Going In-Depth: November 2015 (PDF)

    $2.50

    Want to read the magazine, but don’t want to commit to a subscription?  Purchase the PDF for your own use!

    Here’s what is in this issue of the magazine:

    • Genealogy Solutions: “A Buck Three Eighty- And Other Weird Family Sayings” by Leslie Drewitz
    • Across the Pond: “Worshipful Company of Watermen and Lightermen” by Julie Goucher
    • Indian Territory Genealogy: “Records From the Trail of Tears” by Liz Walker
    • Remember the Ladies: “Beyond the City Directory: Finding Directories” by Gena Philibert-Ortega
    • Stories from the Battlefield: “Healing and Remembrance Through Stories” by Jennifer Holik
    • Timeless Territories: “Researching Land Records in the State-Land States, Part 2” by Michelle Goodrum
    • Blooms and Branches: “The Three Learning Styles: How to Use Them to Teach Genealogy to Kids” by Katie Andrews Potter
    • Going Dutch: “Online Databases and Images of Birth, Marriage and Death Records” by John Boeren
    • Family Reunions: “Let’s Make a Date” by Jenny Cowen
    • Index of Surnames/ Places/ Subjects