Preserving Grandma’s Quilt 2



I don’t know about you but when those cold winter nights come, I love to snuggle down under the handmade quilt that my late Mother made for me just a few years ago. Recently, I was asked “I have my Grandmother’s quilt that she made herself and used on her own bed for years. What is the best way to store it so that it will not get damaged?

This is a great question and one that I get often working as an archivist and preservationist. Many of us have old quilts that were handmade by our ancestors and they should be stored and preserved so that they are not damaged and survive for future generations to enjoy. I find that many people are intimidated and unsure of what to do with their heirloom textiles, such as quilts. Most of the time, preserving textiles is quite easy and something that anyone can do. The one thing to remember with any preservation project that is undertaken is: Don’t Do Anything You Can’t Undo.

The process to preserve a family quilt only requires the purchase of these two items, which can be bought at any online archival materials store: (see list below)

  • Archival Tissue Paper
  • An Archival Box to fit the quilt

Now, I am always asked if the quilt should be thrown into the washing machine and then the dryer to be cleaned. The answer is NO! I understand that Grandma probably did this over and over but now that you want to preserve the quilt, it does not need to be in a washer or dryer. If you feel that you must get it cleaned, I would suggest that you take it to a local dry cleaner that can be trusted to do the job properly. Otherwise, my professional opinion is to not get it cleaned and to not clean it yourself.

If the quilt has rips or tears in it, I suggest that they be left alone. Trying to mend these rips and tears could cause more damage. A textile conservator could be consulted to see if they have the knowledge and ability to restore the quilt. To locate a textile conservator, contact the state archives where you live. They should have one on staff or they could have contact information for the one they use for their textile restoration.


Fold the quilt, interweaving archival tissue paper between each layer so that the quilt does not touch itself. Once the quilt is folded to fit into the archival box, there should be no place where the quilt is touching itself. The archival tissue paper acts as a buffer and a layer of protection from any damage. It also protects the quilt if for some reason mold gets on it; the tissue paper will hopefully keep the mold from spreading.

Place the folded quilt into the archival box. If the quilt is smaller than the box, crumple up archival tissue paper and place round the quilt so that it does not move in the box. Do not stuff the quilt in a box that is too small, this could cause damage. Using the correct size box is important. If you can’t find a perfectly sized box, one that is a little bit larger is better.

Type up information or a narrative of who the quilt belonged to, who made the quilt and how you came to own the quilt. Place this information in the box with the quilt. If you have old photos of the quilt or the person who made it or owned it, make good quality copies on archival paper and put in the box with the quilt. Put the copies and narrative in archival sheet protectors or in archival file folders. This is to insure that the next generation who owns this quilt will know the history.

Store the boxed quilt in a cool, dark and dry place. Never store textiles or genealogical records in attics, basements or in humid places. The best place to store these items are in places where it is cool or even cold. Also, keep away from sunlight and store in a dark place. It is important to check the humidity levels of the storage area. Humidity can cause mold to grow on your quilt and you don’t want that to happen.

Grandma’s quilt is a family heirloom that has endured for many years. Properly preserving it will insure that it will endure for generations to come.

A Listing of Online Archival Stores:

Gaylord Archival
Light Impressions
Hollinger Metal Edge
University Products
Brodart


About Melissa Barker

Melissa Barker is a Certified Archives Manager for the Houston County, TN. Archives. She also lectures, teaches and writes about researching in archives and records preservation. She writes her own blog and has written articles for several publications. She is affectionately known as The Archive Lady. She is also a Professional genealogist that works with clients researching their Tennessee ancestors.

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