Liz Walker


Elizabeth WalkerElizabeth (Liz) Walker, B.A., was born in Evansville, Indiana and raised in  St. Louis, Missouri. She lived in Colorado for several years and has been in the Tulsa, Oklahoma area (former Indian Territory) since 1987. During the late 1980's and 90's when her two youngest children were small, she  was a freelance writer specializing in family issues. One particular family issue that has always interested her is, family history. It's an obsession
that became a profession. She has been a Library Associate at the Tulsa City County Library Genealogy Center since 2000.

In addition to assisting patrons in their ancestor research, Liz conducts classes at the Genealogy Center on a regular basis. She has also spoken at local genealogical societies and at the Cherokee Genealogy Conference held in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

She completed the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Home Study Course in 2005 and was the 2007 recipient of the Richard S. Lackey Memorial, National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) Scholarship, to study at the National Archives. She is also a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) with two documented and several other, as yet, undocumented ancestors.

You can find Liz blogging at http://walkerfamilyconnections.wordpress.com and http://dearestbobbie.wordpress.com

Go In-Depth with Liz:

What is one tip you would give to a newbie genealogist?

Don't start on the Internet.  Step away from your computer right now and look in that pile of papers, or stack of photos on your desk, in your closet, or in the file you haven't opened from your aunt's estate.  The best place to start your research is at home.As you find things of interest, remember to ask questions of any older living relative you know.  If all your older relatives are gone, contact your cousins, or second cousins.  OK-you might have to GOOGLE to find them - but once you do, call or write first.  Don't make the mistake of assuming it's all online and that everything online is correct.

What is your favorite ancestor story?

One of my Dad's cousins once told me that she thought my great grandfather had been arrested for bootlegging in Chicago during prohibition.  So I started searching the Chicago Tribune for the years I knew my family lived there.  My first hit was "Woman Shoots, Man Flees...The man she attempted to shoot was Charles W. Smith..."  My great grandfather!  I didn't find any evidence he was a bootlegger, although he could have been, but there were several articles about this shooting by an apparent, jilted lover. My poor great grandmother was interviewed and she said the woman was just trying to blackmail her husband.

Hmmmm....if he wasn't guilty of anything, what was there to blackmail him with?

What is your favorite repository?

I'm biased, but the Tulsa City County Library's Genealogy Center is one of the best genealogy libraries in the state of Oklahoma.  Check out our website at: http://guides.tulsalibrary.org/genealogy.

 

Find Liz on Social Media:

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Liz's Reprint Policy:

You have permission to reprint articles that have been written by Liz Walker appearing on The In-Depth Genealogist, except any articles published in Going In-Depth, according to the following requirements are met:

  • The article must be reprinted in full with no changes.
  • You must include the following bio with links for each article reprinted.
  • You must link back to the original article through the statement included below.
  • An email must be sent to her with a copy of the reprinted article, she can be reached at Walker Family Connections.

 

Biography:

Liz Walker was born in Indiana and raised in Missouri. She has lived in Oklahoma, former Indian Territory, for more than 26 years.  Her own family research leads her east of the Mississippi but working in an Oklahoma Genealogy Library has taught her about the complicated research involved in finding Five Civilized Tribes ancestors.  Liz can be found blogging at Dearest Bobbie and at Walker Family Connections. Liz is the author of IDG’s monthly column, Five Tribes Genealogy.